Category Archives: Pet Insurance

How Do I Know My Pet is Sick?

Knowing what to watch for in your pet's behavior can help catch illnesses early.

By Nikki Senecal 

 
There are many times I wish my dog could talk, but that feeling is compounded by worry when she seems to be feeling ill. (Talking animals would make the vet’s job easier too!) 

   

If we remember that we’re mammals too, diagnosing our pets can be a little easier. How do you know you’re sick? Vomiting, diarrhea, appetite changes, abnormal bleeding, and lethargy signal something’s wrong in humans. It turns out many of these symptoms signal problems for our pets too.      

Guinea Pig     

  • Bloated abdomen
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Discharge from the eyes or nose
  • Labored breathing
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss

Rabbit   

  • Loud tooth grinding
  • Very hot or very cold ears
  • Discharge from the eyes or nose
  • Labored breathing
  • Drooling or a wet chin
  • Loss of balance or head tilt
  • Abnormal fecal pellets (smaller, irregular shape, droppings laced with fur)
  • Loss of appetite or lethargy

Cat   

  • Decreased appetite
  • Increased thirst
  • Lethargy
  • Stops using the litter box or strains upon elimination
  • Develops puffiness or a lump under the skin
  • Hides for more than a day
  • Becomes ill-tempered or doesn’t want to be touched
  • Increased head shaking
  • Changes his routine or loses interest in his favorite games
  • Stops grooming
  • The “third eyelid” (nictitating membrance) emerges from the corner of his eye

Dog   

  • Lethargy
  • Disorientation
  • Decreased appetite
  • Increased drinking
  • Vomiting or unproductive retching
  • Diarrhea, constipation, or bloody feces
  • Unexplained, sudden weight loss
  • Seizure
  • Pale gums or tongue
  • Increased panting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Persistent cough
  • Straining to urinate, decreased urination, or bloody urination
  • Inflamed ears or skin, or smelly ears
  • Discharge from ears, eyes, or nose
  • Difficulty walking or lameness
  • Head shaking

Take notes on changes in your pet’s habits and health and take him/her to the vet at the first sign of concern. Your vet will want to know details of your pet’s symptoms, including when they began. Until animals learn to talk, your pet needs you to speak for her.

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Filed under Pet Insurance, Pet Tips, Pet Tips - Cats, Pet Tips - Dogs, Pet Tips - Guinea Pigs, Pet Tips - Rabbits

Déjà vu

By Kim Cavallero

Annie's healthcare ran more than $20,000 in the last two years of her life

How much? You must be kidding. $650 to have my seven-year-old cat’s teeth cleaned? No way.

It shouldn’t have stunned me.

I was no stranger to healthcare bills for my pets. After all, my cat, Annie, who passed away last summer racked up more than $20,000+ in healthcare bills in the last two years of her life. She had a gamut of health issues—things the vets liked to tell me they had never seen in the decades they had been practicing.

While the vets were fascinated at how resilient little Annie was, I was simply scared for her. Every time she went in for another surgery, I was left to wonder how she would fare and how I would ever cover the cost.

Annie and I went through the ER at my local university’s animal hospital many times. And it never ceased to amaze many how many people were there with their animals making heartbreaking decisions. I watched countless people decide to euthanize their pet, even thought their pet’s condition was treatable. Their caretakers were dedicated to them, but they simply couldn’t afford to pay the cost of the care. It was gut-wrenching.

So, when my vet recently told me that my newly adopted seven-year-old cat, Emma, needed to have her teeth cleaned and one removed, I wasn’t surprised. But when my vet turned around and told me how much it would be, I couldn’t help but experience déjà vu.

The difference this time around was that I had purchased pet insurance for Emma when I adopted her. Oh sure….I have many friends and acquaintances who thought I was crazy, but it was the best investment I could have ever made. Of Emma’s $650 bill, her insurance covered $421 after my $200 deductible. Emma’s policy ran me about $185 for the year and it’s already more than paid for itself.

Many ask why I didn’t purchase pet insurance for Annie. The truth of the matter is I didn’t know that I should have when I adopted her. Had I tried to insure her after her health problems began, most of her care would have been considered a pre-existing condition and not been covered.

I don’t regret a penny of the money I spent on Annie’s care, even though I will be paying for it for the next few years. Annie was my heart and soul. But the moral of the story is to get insurance for your pet the day you adopt. It will likely save you from having to make heart-breaking decisions.

In my next post, I’ll give some pointers about what to look for when purchasing a pet insurance policy.

 

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Filed under Pet Insurance, Pet Tips, Pet Tips - Cats